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Mortgage Protection Options

Helping to protect your mortgage with a range of protection options to suit your needs.

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What is best for me?

Our Mortgage Protection Options can help ease the financial stress you and your family may feel if you were unable to pay your mortgage – giving you and your family a helping hand by ensuring your home is protected. 

What is Life Benefit?

Life Benefit provides cover in the event of premature death or terminal illness and gives you the option of choosing to receive the benefit as either a lump sum or in monthly instalments.

You can cover yourself for Life Benefit up to the age of 85 and the minimum cover period is five years.

 

What is not covered by Life Benefit?

We will not pay if you die after the expiry date of your cover, or you’re diagnosed as terminally ill but do not die in the 12 months before your cover ends.

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What is Critical Illness Benefit?

Critical Illness Benefit provides cover which can ease the financial burden should you suffer one of the illnesses defined in our Plan. It also provides for total permanent disability.

You have the option of choosing to receive the benefit as either a lump sum or in monthly instalments.

You can cover yourself for Critical Illness Benefit up to the age of 65 and the minimum cover period is five years.


We provide cover for a comprehensive range of medical conditions. We follow the model wordings set by the Association of British Insurers to specify what is and is not covered under each condition.

What critical illnesses are covered?

  • Alzheimer’s disease before age 60 – resulting in permanent symptoms
  • Aorta graft surgery – for disease
  • Benign brain tumour – resulting in permanent symptoms
  • Blindness – permanent and irreversible
  • Cancer – excluding less advanced cases
  • Coma - with associated permanent symptoms
  • Coronary artery by-pass grafts – with surgery to divide the breastbone
  • Deafness – permanent and irreversible
  • Heart attack – of specified severity
  • Heart valve replacement or repair – with surgery to divide the breastbone
  • HIV infection – caught in the UK from a blood transfusion, a physical assault or at work in an eligible occupation
  • Kidney failure – requires permanent dialysis
  • Loss of speech – permanent and irreversible
  • Loss of hand or foot – permanent physical severance
  • Major organ transplant - from another donor
  • Motor Neurone disease – resulting in permanent symptoms
  • Multiple Sclerosis – with persisting symptoms
  • Paralysis of limb – total and irreversible
  • Parkinson’s disease before age 60 – resulting in permanent symptoms
  • Stroke – resulting in permanent symptoms
  • Third degree burns – covering 20% of the body’s surface area
  • Total Permanent Disability - unable before age 65 to look after yourself ever again
  • Traumatic brain injury – resulting in permanent symptoms 

 

How is total permanent disability measured?

We measure total permanent disability by assessing your ability to perform any three of the following activities, without the help or supervision of another person and be unable to perform the task on your own, even with the use of special equipment routinely available to help and having taken any appropriate prescribed medication:

  • Washing: the ability to wash in the bath or shower (including getting into and out of the bath or shower) or wash satisfactorily by other means.
  • Getting dressed and undressed: the ability to put on, take off, secure and unfasten all garments and, if needed, any braces, artificial limbs or other surgical appliances.
  • Feeding yourself: the ability to feed yourself when food has been prepared and made available.
  • Maintaining personal hygiene: the ability to maintain a satisfactory level of personal hygiene by using the toilet or otherwise managing bowel and bladder function.
  • Getting between rooms: the ability to get from room to room on a level floor.
  • Getting in and out of bed: the ability to get out of bed into an upright chair or wheelchair and back again.

 

What Is not covered by Critical Illness Benefit?

You are not covered if the cause of the claim results from alcohol or drug abuse, HIV/AIDS (except where specifically included under our Plan definition), self-inflicted injury or war and civil commotion.

We will not pay if you die, or if your cover ceases, within 30 days of the diagnosis of critical illness or within six months of the diagnosis of total permanent disability.

 

Waiver of Premium

If you are not in a high-risk occupation you can choose to have Waiver of Premium cover when you apply for your Plan.


If you choose this cover, we’ll pay your premiums after six months of incapacity and continue to pay them until the first of these events:

  • You recover and are no longer incapacitated.
  • You reach your 65th birthday.
  • Your cover ends.
  • You die.

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What is Combined Life and Critical Illness Benefit?

Provides cover for premature death, terminal illness, total permanent disability and a range of critical illnesses.

You have the option of choosing to receive the benefit as either a lump sum or in monthly instalments.

You can cover yourself for Combined Life and Critical Illness Benefit up to the age of 65 and the minimum cover period is five years.


We provide cover for a comprehensive range of medical conditions. We follow the model wordings set by the Association of British Insurers to specify what is and is not covered under each condition.

What critical illnesses are covered?

  • Alzheimer’s disease before age 60 – resulting in permanent symptoms
  • Aorta graft surgery – for disease
  • Benign brain tumour – resulting in permanent symptoms
  • Blindness – permanent and irreversible
  • Cancer – excluding less advanced cases
  • Coma - with associated permanent symptoms
  • Coronary artery by-pass grafts – with surgery to divide the breastbone
  • Deafness – permanent and irreversible
  • Heart attack – of specified severity
  • Heart valve replacement or repair – with surgery to divide the breastbone
  • HIV infection – caught in the UK from a blood transfusion, a physical assault or at work in an eligible occupation
  • Kidney failure – requires permanent dialysis
  • Loss of speech – permanent and irreversible
  • Loss of hand or foot – permanent physical severance
  • Major organ transplant - from another donor
  • Motor Neurone disease – resulting in permanent symptoms
  • Multiple Sclerosis – with persisting symptoms
  • Paralysis of limb – total and irreversible
  • Parkinson’s disease before age 60 – resulting in permanent symptoms
  • Stroke – resulting in permanent symptoms
  • Third degree burns – covering 20% of the body’s surface area
  • Total Permanent Disability - unable before age 65 to look after yourself ever again
  • Traumatic brain injury – resulting in permanent symptoms 

 

How is total permanent disability measured?

We measure total permanent disability by assessing your ability to perform any three of the following activities, without the help or supervision of another person and be unable to perform the task on your own, even with the use of special equipment routinely available to help and having taken any appropriate prescribed medication:

  • Washing: the ability to wash in the bath or shower (including getting into and out of the bath or shower) or wash satisfactorily by other means.
  • Getting dressed and undressed: the ability to put on, take off, secure and unfasten all garments and, if needed, any braces, artificial limbs or other surgical appliances.
  • Feeding yourself: the ability to feed yourself when food has been prepared and made available.
  • Maintaining personal hygiene: the ability to maintain a satisfactory level of personal hygiene by using the toilet or otherwise managing bowel and bladder function.
  • Getting between rooms: the ability to get from room to room on a level floor.
  • Getting in and out of bed: the ability to get out of bed into an upright chair or wheelchair and back again.

 

What Is not covered by Critical Illness Benefit?

We will not pay if you die after the expiry date for your cover, or if you’re diagnosed as terminally ill but do not die in the 12 months before your cover ends.

We will not pay for critical illness if your cover period ends within 30 days of the diagnosis of critical illness or within 6 months of the diagnosis of total permanent disability.

We will not pay out for critical illness if the cause of the claim results from alcohol or drug abuse, HIV/AIDS (except where specifically included under our Plan definition), self-inflicted injury or war and civil commotion.

 

Waiver of Premium

If you are not in a high-risk occupation you can choose to have Waiver of Premium cover when you apply for your Plan.

If you choose this cover, we’ll pay your premiums after six months of incapacity and continue to pay them until the first of these events:

  • You recover and are no longer incapacitated.
  • You reach your 65th birthday.
  • Your cover ends.
  • You die.

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Save for yourself

Our ISA gives you the flexibility of combining a Stocks and Shares ISA and a Lifetime ISA into one Plan if you wish to do so.

You can save from as little as £20 a month up to a maximum of £20,000 each year of which no more than £4,000 can be invested in the Lifetime ISA. 

Find out more

 

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